YEARBOOK OF MORPHOLOGY

Edited by
Geert Booij & Jaap van Marle
Springer

From the publisher's website:

A revival of interest in morphology has occurred during recent years. The Yearbook of Morphology series, published since 1988, has proven to be an eminent support for this upswing of morphological research, since it contains articles on topics which are central in the current theoretical debates, and which are frequently referred to. Thus it has set a standard for morphological research.

The Yearbook of Morphology is the only existing scientific journal completely dedicated to linguistic morphology. Theoretical, descriptive, and historical linguists, morphologists, phonologists, computational linguists, and psycholinguists will find this journal of interest.

Editors

Consulting Editors

Editorial address:

Editors, Yearbook of Morphology
Faculteit der Letteren, Vrije Universiteit
De Boelelaan 1105
1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Yearbook of Morphology 2004

Hardcover, ISBN: 1-4020-2899-7

Published by Springer

In the Yearbook of Morphology 2004 a number of papers is devoted to the topic "Morphology and Linguistic Typology". These papers were presented at the Fourth Mediterranean Morphology Meeting in Catania, in September 2003. Within the context of this denominator, a number of issues are discussed wich bear upon universals and typology. These issues include: universals and diachrony, sign language, syncretism, periphrasis, etc.

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Yearbook of Morphology 2003

Hardbound, ISBN 1-4020-1272-1,  August 2003

Available online as e-book at Kluwer-online.

In the Yearbook of Morphology 2003 a large number of articles is devoted to the phenomenon of complex predicates consisting of a verb preceded by a preverb. Such complex predicates exhibit both morphological and syntactic behaviour, and thus form a testing ground for theories of the relation between morphology and syntax. Evidence is presented from a wide variety of languages including Germanic, Romance, Australian, and Uralic languages. A number of articles present historical evidence on the change of preverbal elements into prefixes. Topics such as grammaticalization, constructional idioms, and derivational periphrasis are also discussed.

In addition, this Yearbook of Morphology contains articles on morphological parsing, and on the role of paradigmatical relations in analogical change.

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Yearbook of Morphology 2002

Hardbound,  ISBN 1-4020-1150-4,  June 2003

Available online as e-book at Kluwer-online.

In the Yearbook of Morphology 2002 a number of articles is devoted to the morphology of a variety of pidgin and creole languages which appear to have much more morphology than traditionally assumed.

A second topic of this volume is the morphological use of truncation for the coinage of proper names in Germanic and Romance languages, in particular endearment forms, with highly interesting consequences for the theory of phonology-morphology interaction.

Thirdly, this volume contains articles on how affixes are combined and ordered in complex words, and the complex linguistic principles behind these orderings.

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Yearbook of Morphology 2001

Hardbound,  ISBN 1-4020-0724-8,  September 2002

In the Yearbook of Morphology 2001 a number of articles is devoted to the notion of productivity, and the role of analogy in coining new words. In relation to this topic, constraints on affix ordering in a number of Germanic languages are investigated.

A second topic of this volume is the necessity and the role of the paradigm in morphological analyses; arguments for and against the formal role of the paradigm are presented.

Thirdly, this volume discusses a number of general issues in morphological theory such as the relation between form and meaning in morphology, the accessibility of the internal morphological structure of complex words, and the interaction of morphology and prosody in truncation processes.

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Yearbook of Morphology 2000

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-7082-1,  September 2001

The Yearbook of Morphology 2000 focuses on the relation between morphology and syntax. First, a number of articles is devoted to the ways in which morphological features can be expressed in the grammar of natural languages, both by morphological and syntactic devices. This also raises the more general issue of how we have to conceive of the relation between form and (grammatical) meaning. Several formalisms for inflectional paradigms are proposed. In addition, this volume deals with the demarcation between morphology and syntax: to which extent can syntactic principles and generalizations be used for a proper account of the morphology of a language? The languages discussed are Potawatomi, Latin, Greek, Romanian, West-Greenlandic, and German. A special feature of this volume is a section devoted to the analysis of the morphosyntax of a number of Austronesian languages, which are also relevant for deepening our insights into the relation between our morphology and syntax.

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Yearbook of Morphology 1999

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-6631-X,  February 2001

The Yearbook of Morphology 1999 focuses on diachronic morphology, and shows, in a number of articles by renowned specialists, how complicated morphological systems develop in the course of time. In addition, this volume deals with a number of hotly debated issues in theoretical morphology: its interaction with phonology (including Optimality Theory), the relation between inflection and word formation, and the formal modeling of inflectional systems. A special feature of this volume is an article on morphology in sign language, a very new and exciting area of research in linguistics.

The relevant evidence comes from a wide variety of languages, amongst which Germanic, Romance, and Slavic languages are prominent.

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Yearbook of Morphology 1998

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-6035-4,  October 1999

The Yearbook of Morphology 1998 focuses on two issues: the position of inflection in the grammar, and the interaction of morphology with phonology, in particular the problem of allomorphy. In addition, this volume presents a study of the relation between transposition and argument structure, a declarative model of word formation applied to conversion in German, an analysis of Dutch verbal compounds and a study of the semantic aspects of nominalization. The relevant evidence comes from a wide variety of languages.

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Yearbook of Morphology 1997

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-5092-8,  June 1998

The Yearbook of Morphology 1997 focuses on the relationship between morphology and other modules of the grammar, especially phonology, syntax and semantics. Among the basic questions discussed are: how does morphology differ from other modules of the grammar, syntax in particular? What are the possible forms of interaction between the modules? How does semantics constrain formal variation in morphology? The evidence adduced is derived from a variety of languages.

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Yearbook of Morphology 1996

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-4563-0,  May 1997

The Yearbook of Morphology 1996 focuses on the relationship between morphology and psycholinguistics. Basic questions such as the following are discussed. To what extent does the morphological structure of a word play a role in its perception and production? Are regular complex words created anew each time they are used, or are they stored in the lexicon? The relevant evidence comes from a variety of European languages. Another important theme in this yearbook is the degree of autonomy of morphology: in which respect does it differ from other modules of the grammar? The present yearbook also contains articles on periphrasis, the nature of inflectional morphology and syncretism in derivational morphology.

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Yearbook of Morphology 1995

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-3984-3,  March 1996

The Yearbook of Morphology 1995 focuses on an important issue in the current morphological debate: the relation between inflection and word formation. What are the criteria for their demarcation, in which ways do they interact and how is this distinction acquired by children? The papers presented here concur in rejecting the `split morphology hypothesis' that claims that inflection and word formation belong to different components of the grammar. This volume also deals with the marked phenomenon of subtractive morphology and its theoretical implications.

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Yearbook of Morphology 1994

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-3244-X,  April 1995

The Yearbook of Morphology 1994 focuses on prosodic morphology, i.e. the interaction between morphological and prosodic structure, on the semantics of word formation, and on a number of related issues in the realm of inflection: the structure of paradigms, the relation between inflection and word formation, and patterns of language change with respect to inflection. There is also discussion of the relevance of the notion 'level ordering' for morphological generalizations.

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Yearbook of Morphology 1993

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-2494-3,  December 1993

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Yearbook of Morphology 1992

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-1937-0,  December 1992

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Yearbook of Morphology 1991

Hardbound,  ISBN 0-7923-1416-6,  December 1991

The 1991 Yearbook of Morphology contains a number of articles on inflectional classes which investigate in detail how the relations between the morphological notion of 'inflectional class', the syntactic notions 'gender' and 'noun class', and semantic classifications of entities have to be considered.

A second topic of this Yearbook is the relation between the linguistic, psycholinguistic and statistical interpretations of the notion 'morphological productivity', and its relation to frequency data and the structure of the mental lexicon. This topic is discussed by linguists and psycholinguists. In addition, the Yearbook features an article on the types of formal operation that an adequate morphological theory has to allow for, and some reviews of recent morphological publications. All theoretical and historical linguists, morphologists, phonologists, and psycholinguists interested in linguistic issues will want to read this volume.

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Yearbook of Morphology 1990

Paperback, ISBN 3-11-013374-1, Published by Foris Publications, Dordrecht

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Yearbook of Morphology 1989

Cloth, ISBN 3-11-013362-8, Published by Foris Publications, Dordrecht

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Yearbook of Morphology 1988

Published by Foris Publications, Dordrecht

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